historical-nonfiction:

A Pythagorean cup looks like a normal drinking cup, except that the bowl has a central column in it. It was supposedly invented by Pythagoras of Samos (yes, that one). It allows the user to fill the cup with wine up to a certain level. If the user fills only to that level, the imbiber may enjoy a drink in peace. If, however, the user gets greedy, the cup dumps all the wine into the unfortunate victim’s lap.

historical-nonfiction:

A Pythagorean cup looks like a normal drinking cup, except that the bowl has a central column in it. It was supposedly invented by Pythagoras of Samos (yes, that one). It allows the user to fill the cup with wine up to a certain level. If the user fills only to that level, the imbiber may enjoy a drink in peace. If, however, the user gets greedy, the cup dumps all the wine into the unfortunate victim’s lap.

(via tassande)

hello-language-that-is-all:

writtenbymadeline:

A tool to use for find Synonyms: Synonym Finder.

This is a great, unique little tool I found by browsing for writing resources. It’s name speaks for itself: it’s a synonym finder.

The site is clean cut, has soothing colors, and to-the point results for any word you look up.

For example, when I look up the word “romance,” I get this:

Synonyms: romance, romanticism
Definition: an exciting and mysterious quality (as of a heroic time or adventure)

Hypernyms: quality
Definition: an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone
Usage: the quality of mercy is not strained—Shakespeare”

I had no idea what a “hypernym” is. Apparently it’s a word with a more general meaning that a more specific word fall under. Like, color is a hypernym for green.

On the right corner there’s a button to make graphs! So you can trace each synonym from it’s root word, and see how far the other synonyms connect in comparison to others.

I really like it, so I’m going to definitely bookmark it on my writing tools list.

Okay, but be careful when using synonyms because a lot of times you go to a thesaurus or even a website, pick out a really good word to use instead of something short and common, and then it conveys something totally different because synonyms can differ so greatly by nuance

(via linguaphilioist)

starting slowly are you ready for this good luck with this shit gets real last night BUT hier soir !!! soirée also means bon courage

jaimetalangue:

FR- Le jour ou la journée ? A guide to use the right word

So I made this thing because I’ve seen to many mistakes between these 2 kinds of vocab. And that’s understandable because English and so many languages don’t make any distinction there!

Also, my English translations of my French examples are not meant to be 100% correct English, but sometimes more like literal translations in order to get the idea. So yeah don’t send me a fuckton of corrections unless you spotted an actual mistake (also it’s been proofread by an actual native English speaker).

The examples in italics are interchangeable synonyms with their respective counterparts, except that le nouvel an is a lot more used than la nouvelle année in my opinion (maybe there are regional differences idk).

If you have any questions or suggestions, just ask me :)

(via polyglotted)

lance-the-kanto-dragon-master:

fromseveralroomsaway:

leannewoodfull:

lutefisktacoandbeer:

kittymudface:

It gets better—the guy is deaf, and he taught his cat the sign for “food.” So the cat’s not just saying “put that in my mouth,” it’s actually signing

Not only that, but if you notice at the beginning, the cat *gets the man’s attention* as any person who wanted to talk to a deaf/hoh individual would (well, and vice versa IME). I’ve done sign since I was 5, and generally, w/o eye contact initially, you wave a hand or lightly touch the arm (if that’s ok with the person you’re trying to converse with, of course). Generally, adult cats meow mostly to humans, but this cat has figured out that’s not going to work and has adapted. Animal companions! They are INCREDIBLE.

Amazing.

EVERYONE STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND LOOK AT THIS CAT.

AND THE WAY IT NODS OMG

lance-the-kanto-dragon-master:

fromseveralroomsaway:

leannewoodfull:

lutefisktacoandbeer:

kittymudface:

It gets better—the guy is deaf, and he taught his cat the sign for “food.” So the cat’s not just saying “put that in my mouth,” it’s actually signing

Not only that, but if you notice at the beginning, the cat *gets the man’s attention* as any person who wanted to talk to a deaf/hoh individual would (well, and vice versa IME). I’ve done sign since I was 5, and generally, w/o eye contact initially, you wave a hand or lightly touch the arm (if that’s ok with the person you’re trying to converse with, of course). 
Generally, adult cats meow mostly to humans, but this cat has figured out that’s not going to work and has adapted. Animal companions! They are INCREDIBLE.

Amazing.

EVERYONE STOP WHAT YOU ARE DOING AND LOOK AT THIS CAT.

AND THE WAY IT NODS OMG

(via polyglottalstop)

jaded-mandarin:

Marten van Valckenborch the Elder. Detail from The Tower of Babel, 1595.

(via palidorandtheelks)

polyglottalstop:

lavidapoliglota:

if you need an extra push to study your target language, think about a person you really admire/have a mahoosive crush on and tell yourself you will learn it to get closer to them

I mean it’s a really fucking creepy notion if this is an unreciprocated desire and surely shouldn’t be your single motivation, but I mean, if you need an extra nudge

Not that this blogger would ever do that >.>

is it possible to become fluent in a language by not sutyding and just eating pizza and watching netflix all day? asking for a friend

Anonymous

polyglotted:

Maybe if you’re only watching movies in Netlix in that foreign language…. I haven’t tried it though (but now I want pizza, thanks).

Have your friend perform that experiment and let me know how it works out :D

romancingthelanguages:

Niños con perros de presa de Francisco de Goya

| Dogs and children |

Gosse in French is slang for kid it should not be confused with Catalan Gos meaning dog. Some people think that these words could be related, others relate gosse to Italian gonzo that once meant simple minded. But it most likely comes from gouspin an old world meaning rascal. 

Which does comes from dog is the Mexican slang for kid, escuíncle most etymologies link it to the náhuatl word itzcuintlithat referred to hairless dog of Pre-Colombian Mexico.

And talking about animals and kids… English kid means a young goat. And urchin too :  Old Norse kið ”young goat,” from Proto-Germanic *kiðjom. Applied to skillful young thieves and pugilists since at least 1812. [OED]

In Chile  cabro or cabro chico is slang for a young boy. It does resemble the Spanish word for goat “cabra” but I’m not sure sure it’s related. Be careful because in many others countries it’s slang for homosexual or a curse world. 

It all differs from main Common Latin etymology ninnus : niño (ñ), nen (cat) or Latin creaturas: criança (pt), criatura (ñ) or infantus enfant (fr).Italian bambino is said to be a onomatopeyan word from childlish babbling. While Romanian copil comes from another natural kingdom, it probablys comes from Slavic *kopylŭ  meaning shoot or sprout.

(via polyglottalstop)

bull-shipping:

bull-shipping:

bull-shipping:

what are the strongest days of the week?

saturday and sunday. the rest are weekdays.

stop unfollowing me

(via pablets)

highfunctioningrubberduck:

enjoltaireoutmyheart:

fortheloveofotps:

unseen-ninja2:

Wtf sweden

i wanna learn swedish

I am proud to be Swedish.

I can confirm that Swedish is one of the easiest languages in the world

(via linguaphilioist)

Origins of Common UI Symbols

discreetsheep:

Symbol etymology. Because I like to know from whence my symbols came.

(via polyglottalstop)

Linguistics By Example Sentence

speculativegrammarian:

Color Terminology—Kay turned green with envy and then red with anger when Berlin was listed as first author.

trickstarbrave:

sometimes you hear the correct pronunciation for something and you just

refuse to acknowledge it at all

(via umlauts-are-happy-letters)

  • 1:Your native language.

  • 2:Which languages you know.

  • 3:Which languages you are learning, or want to learn.

  • 4:Does anyone in your family speak a language that you don't?

  • 5:Your favorite language to listen to.

  • 6:Your least favorite language to listen to.

  • 7:Your favorite word in your native language.

  • 8:Your favorite word in your second language(if you know one).

  • 9:Your favorite word in a language you don't really speak.

  • 10:A list of your favorite words in any language.

  • 11:A song you like in a language other than English.

  • 12:If you could pick one language to learn automatically without having to work for it, which language would you choose?

  • 13:Have you ever seen a whole movie in a language you don't understand?

  • 14:A language you like, but wouldn't put the effort into learning.

  • 15:Write a short introduction of yourself in a language other than English.