neuromorphogenesis:

Language and Your Brain

For centuries, researchers have studied the brain to find exactly where mechanisms for producing and interpreting language reside. Theories abound on how humans acquire new languages and how our developing brains learn to process languages.

By Voxy.

(via polyglottalstop)

Dr. Patricia Kuhl
The linguistic genius of babies.


neurosciencestuff:

Study provides new insight into how toddlers learn verbs
Parents can help toddlers’ language skills by showing them a variety of examples of different actions, according to new research from the University of Liverpool.
Previous research has shown that verbs pose particular difficulties to toddlers as they refer to actions rather than objects, and actions are often different each time a child sees them.
To find out more about this area of child language, University psychologists asked a group of toddlers to watch one of two short videos.
They then examined whether watching a cartoon star repeat the same action, compared to a character performing three different actions, affected the children’s understanding of verbs.
Developmental psychologist, Dr Katherine Twomey, said: “Knowledge of how children start to learn language is important to our understanding of how they progress throughout preschool and school years.
“This is the first study to indicate that showing toddlers similar but, importantly, not identical actions actually helped them understand what a verb refers to, instead of confusing them as you might expect.”
Dr Jessica Horst from the University of Sussex who collaborated on the research added: “It is a crucial first step in understanding how what children see affects how they learn verbs and action categories, and provides the groundwork for future studies to examine in more detail exactly what kinds of variability affect how children learn words.”

neurosciencestuff:

Study provides new insight into how toddlers learn verbs

Parents can help toddlers’ language skills by showing them a variety of examples of different actions, according to new research from the University of Liverpool.

Previous research has shown that verbs pose particular difficulties to toddlers as they refer to actions rather than objects, and actions are often different each time a child sees them.

To find out more about this area of child language, University psychologists asked a group of toddlers to watch one of two short videos.

They then examined whether watching a cartoon star repeat the same action, compared to a character performing three different actions, affected the children’s understanding of verbs.

Developmental psychologist, Dr Katherine Twomey, said: “Knowledge of how children start to learn language is important to our understanding of how they progress throughout preschool and school years.

“This is the first study to indicate that showing toddlers similar but, importantly, not identical actions actually helped them understand what a verb refers to, instead of confusing them as you might expect.”

Dr Jessica Horst from the University of Sussex who collaborated on the research added: “It is a crucial first step in understanding how what children see affects how they learn verbs and action categories, and provides the groundwork for future studies to examine in more detail exactly what kinds of variability affect how children learn words.”

neurosciencenews:

A Biological Engine for Human Language
For more than a decade, North­eastern psy­chology pro­fessor Iris Berent has focused her research on one cen­tral ques­tion: What makes human lan­guage so spe­cial? So far, she’s addressed that ques­tion by con­ducting exper­i­ments on speakers of lan­guages as diverse as Hebrew and Amer­ican Sign Language.
Through this research, she’s uncov­ered some sur­prising things. For instance, her work has shown that regard­less of our mother tongue, we prefer cer­tain lin­guistic struc­tures to others. Despite sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ences between lan­guages as unre­lated as Korean and Spanish, all of them seem to share the same set of unwritten rules that dic­tate how sounds can be arranged to form words.
Read the full article A Biological Engine for Human Language at NeuroscienceNews.com.
The research is in PLOS ONE (full open access) and PNAS (full access paywall)
Research: “Language Universals Engage Broca’s Area” by Iris Berent, Hong Pan, Xu Zhao, Jane Epstein, Monica L. Bennett, Vibhas Deshpande, Ravi Teja Seethamraju, and Emily Stern in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0095155 (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0095155)
“Language universals at birth” by David Maximiliano Gómez, Iris Berent, Silvia Benavides-Varela, Ricardo A. H. Bion, Luigi Cattarossi, Marina Nespor, and Jacques Mehler in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1318261111
Image: The syllable structure manipulation activated primary auditory cortex (A), and this effect was specifically due to the structure of monosyllables (B). Syllable structure also modulated hemodynamic response in motor areas (C), but these effects, significant at the larynx area, resulted in deactivation (D). Responses to monosyllables are plotted in blue; disyllables are indicated in red. Credit Berent et al/PLOS ONE.

neurosciencenews:

A Biological Engine for Human Language

For more than a decade, North­eastern psy­chology pro­fessor Iris Berent has focused her research on one cen­tral ques­tion: What makes human lan­guage so spe­cial? So far, she’s addressed that ques­tion by con­ducting exper­i­ments on speakers of lan­guages as diverse as Hebrew and Amer­ican Sign Language.

Through this research, she’s uncov­ered some sur­prising things. For instance, her work has shown that regard­less of our mother tongue, we prefer cer­tain lin­guistic struc­tures to others. Despite sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ences between lan­guages as unre­lated as Korean and Spanish, all of them seem to share the same set of unwritten rules that dic­tate how sounds can be arranged to form words.

Read the full article A Biological Engine for Human Language at NeuroscienceNews.com.

The research is in PLOS ONE (full open access) and PNAS (full access paywall)

Research: “Language Universals Engage Broca’s Area” by Iris Berent, Hong Pan, Xu Zhao, Jane Epstein, Monica L. Bennett, Vibhas Deshpande, Ravi Teja Seethamraju, and Emily Stern in PLOS ONE. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0095155 (http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0095155)

“Language universals at birth” by David Maximiliano Gómez, Iris Berent, Silvia Benavides-Varela, Ricardo A. H. Bion, Luigi Cattarossi, Marina Nespor, and Jacques Mehler in PNAS. doi:10.1073/pnas.1318261111

Image: The syllable structure manipulation activated primary auditory cortex (A), and this effect was specifically due to the structure of monosyllables (B). Syllable structure also modulated hemodynamic response in motor areas (C), but these effects, significant at the larynx area, resulted in deactivation (D). Responses to monosyllables are plotted in blue; disyllables are indicated in red. Credit Berent et al/PLOS ONE.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

(via thelifeofalinguist)

leonardodavinci-art:

The proportions of the human figure (The Vitruvian Man)

Artist: Leonardo da Vinci

Completion Date: 1492

Place of Creation: Milan, Italy

Style: High Renaissance

Genre: design

Technique: ink

Material: paper

Dimensions: 24.5 x 34.3 cm

Gallery: Gallerie dell’Accademia, Venice, Italy

http://transliterations.tumblr.com/post/82881146099/tongueturner-lookatmylanguages

tongueturner:

lookatmylanguages:

leandraholmes:

spockhetti:

captainharvey:

yesthisiskenzie:

quazza:

i am reminded that english is a flawed language every time I am forced to use “that that” in a sentence

it’s not fair that that happens

Ihr glaubt doch…

Sorry, That's Not an Emoticon in a 1648 Poem :(

wuglife:

The sequence of a colon “:” and a closed parenthesis “)” certainly looks like a smiley face to modern readers. However, there is good evidence (discussed in the article) for why this sequence was not intended to be an emoticon, face, or otherwise symbolic beyond the literal punctuation.

So let’s not engage in “presentism” and interpret sequences of colons (or semicolons) and parentheses as spectral versions of our own emoticons. Instead, let’s appreciate early-modern texts on their own terms, and celebrate the wild exuberance of their now-forgotten punctuation hybrids. That’s still worth a smiley face.

And just my own quick analysis: in the poetry referenced in the article, there are plenty of open parentheses that would not be closed without their righthand counterparts. Though there may be a sort of double-entendre, as described in this article’s analysis of “;)”, I suspect the use of colons and semicolons is more likely indicating a pause in rhythm. Moreover, the oldest textual faces that are definitely emoticons all seem to have noses. Just like the smiley face (without a nose) only became symbolic in the late 1940s, the caricature style of noseless people seems to be a fairly modern invention. That being said, I speculate that noseless emoticons would be harder to recognize as faces for people who had not been exposed to depiction of faces without noses.

(via transliterations)

You can’t get anywhere if you just copy what somebody told you. You have to be challenging things all the time, challenging everything, thinking new thoughts. And there you’ve got a real contradiction. It’s hard to train people to be creative and challenging and yet to ensure that somewhere else in their lives that they’re conformist and obedient
Noam Chomsky (here)

(via noam-chomsky)

neurosciencenews:

Brain Anatomy Differences Between Deaf and Hearing Depend on First Language Learned

In the first known study of its kind, researchers have shown that the language we learn as children affects brain structure, as does hearing status. The findings are reported in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Read the full article Brain Anatomy Differences Between Deaf and Hearing Depend on First Language Learned at NeuroscienceNews.com.

The research will be published in Journal of Neuroscience.

Research: The research will be available in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Image: Researchers noted differences in white matter volume in the auditory cortex between the deaf and hearing subjects. They also found differences in the left hemisphere language areas specific to those whose native language was ASL. This image is for illustrative purposes and is not connected to the research. It shows the location of the auditory cortex in the brain. Credit Chittka L, Brockmann.

Imagine you’re in a cafe and someone asks you whether you want a coffee. In English, the conversation might go like this:

"Do you want a coffee?"
“Thank you.”

And a few minutes later you’d have a coffee in front of you. But if you said this is French, the result would be very different:

"Voulez-vous un café?"
“Merci.”

No coffee would arrive. Because ‘merci’ on its own like that means “thanks but no thanks”. You’re refusing. If you want to say “yes”, you would have to say “yes” (“oui”) or “please” (“s’il vous plaît”) or “yes thanks” (“oui merci”) or the like.

A Little Book of Language by David Crystal, page 123. (via linguaphilioist)

(via languagelinguistics)

thenaebyrd777:

egberts:

wikeni:

kanmae-west:

nymph-in-the-yellow-dress:

egberts:

spooktre:

egberts:

minute and minute shouldn’t be spelled the same

im not content with this content

i object to that object

I need to read what I read again

Excuse me but there’s no excuse for this

Someone should wind this post up and throw it in the wind

i hope you dont mind but you just fucked with my mind

fuck all of you

(via johnlock-is-a-thing)

heatmor:

irish is such a shady language because hello is “dia duit” but directly translated it means “god be with you” and when someone says hello back they say “dia is muire duit” which means “god and mary be with you” .. its like “i see your god and i raise you the holy virgin whatcha gonna do bout it bitch”

(via polyglottalstop)

The Grammar of Happiness

allthingslinguistic:

This film is playing at the Linguistics Institute tonight, but you can also watch it online at the link. More on the controversy about Daniel Everett’s research from Language Log, Lingua Franca, and the New York Times.